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George Street Spion Kop

PostPosted: Sun Dec 26, 2010 9:33 pm
by Cheshire Cat
Sorry if this is a bit off topic.

Why did George Street get renamed and what was the relevance of the new name.

Re: George Street Spion Kop

PostPosted: Mon Dec 27, 2010 2:02 am
by m8tey
What is the new name, or am i missing something.......

Re: George Street Spion Kop

PostPosted: Mon Dec 27, 2010 11:28 am
by Tomas Drouty
I think renaming George Street to Mosscar Close possibly had something to do with not having 2 streets with the same name in the same postcode area, but that's only my guess ... I'm sure the actual reason will be in the parish council records somewhere so I'll look it up.... when did the name change happen .. must be around 15 years ago now at least because I know I was still a paper lad when it did.

Re: George Street Spion Kop

PostPosted: Mon Dec 27, 2010 6:31 pm
by Cheshire Cat
Thanks Tomas. I didn't relaise I'd been driving past and wondering for so long.

Re: George Street Spion Kop

PostPosted: Thu Jan 20, 2011 10:58 pm
by chalky
with spion kop being named after a battle in the second boer war i got to wondering if mosscar was the name of a town,hill,battle or something else to do with boer war.i seem to remember as a child being told that the small hill you descend when going into spion kop from warsop was nicknamed majuba hill after a battle in the afore mentioned war

Re: George Street Spion Kop

PostPosted: Thu Jan 20, 2011 11:07 pm
by Caz
I don't know of any connection but Spion Kop was indeed named after Sir John Talbot Coke of Mansfield Woodhouse who was a General in the Boar War at the battle of Spion Kop. We had a thread some time ago about Spion Kop and there may be some info on there. http://www.forum.warsopweb.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=1835&start=15

Re: George Street Spion Kop

PostPosted: Fri Jan 21, 2011 9:08 pm
by whitevanman
One possibility of the meaning of Mosscarr,

Moss is the old english word for Swamp or Bog,
and Carr is a variant of the Scottish name Kerr, which was the surname of someone living next to boggy ground.

There was a Mosscarr Farm at one time (many years ago) so if the ground round that area was boggy in medieval times then it could have come from this.

Re: George Street Spion Kop

PostPosted: Sat Jan 22, 2011 1:05 am
by Caz
Carr is also a name for boggy land, hence The Carrs - it used to be boggy!

Re: George Street Spion Kop

PostPosted: Mon Jan 24, 2011 12:15 pm
by tightwadswife
I just noticed on Sanderson's map (1835) the stretch of The River Meden between Nettleworth and the Hammerwater Bridge is referred to as the Moscarr Drain, so it's obviously a traditional name for the area. I think the 'new' bungalow near the fishing ponds is called Mosscarr bungalow. Where was the Mosscarr farm?
Speaking from experience, having two George Streets with Warsop postcodes did sometimes create problems for the postal service and I suspect for other delivery services and I think this was probably the main reason for the change.

Re: George Street Spion Kop

PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2012 1:58 pm
by dalenorris
Can take you back to 1966. At the time, I was on The Co-op Milk round, my first job. My round, took me to Spion Kop, and indeed, brought me and my first wife together, as she was a Spion Kop girl. But thats for another day. My story, is true, and not made up. In those days, George Street, was an unmade road, all the way to the top. In winter, it became almost impassable, but because we used the Battery Milk Float of the day, and of course the weight, it didnt stop us getting to the top. This day, it was snowy, icy, and very cold. The post van was at the bottom, and couldnt get up the hill. So the postie, asked me, if we could deliver a parcel to the top house, on the left.....David Reeves ?...... It was about 3 foot long, 8 inches wide. No problem, so I put it on the top of the milk crates. we progressed up the street, delivering as we went, and just on the brow of the hill, we hit a bump, and, yes, you guessed it, the parcel dropped off, and without stopping, slid, down the hill, round the corner. We eventually found it, across the A60, in Bill Woods driveway. On retreaving it, the parcel had burst open, for us to find, it was an artificial leg. Brand new one. I personally walked back up the hill, with the leg, under my arm, and delivered it personally. Nothing was ever said. Lots of memories of the guys on the Co-op milk, Louis Hickton, Ronnie Walker, Terry Broughton, Alan Bowers, Derek Knowles, Mick Sentance, Mick Talbot. Are they still around.